Spirals and Swirls – Hocking Spiral Green Depression Glass

Last post we saw a piece of US Swirl from US Glass, a rather heavy pattern with a strong spiral motif.  Today we have Spiral from Hocking which can be confusing!

Spiral Green Depression Glass Sherbet from Hocking

Spiral Green Depression Glass Sherbet from Hocking

Maybe you can help with the confusion here. The sherbet above is Spiral from Hocking and you can see the spirals originate from the center and go clockwise, to the right.  Per my Gene Florence book, Collector’s Encyclopedia of Depression Glass, 19th Edition, Hocking Spirals go to the right.  Twisted Optic from Imperial has spirals to the left.

Spiral Green Sherbet Showing Clockwise Spirals

Spiral Green Sherbet Showing Clockwise Spirals

It depends how you look at the piece. This is the same sherbet and see how the spirals clearly go to the left?  Try to imagine what it would look like if you tilted it.  (My head hurts when I do this.)  When you look down from the top it swirls to the right, clockwise.

 

Spiral Green Sherbet Showing Counterclockwise Spirals

 

Hocking made two pitchers and we were lucky enough to get both.  Unfortunately this was long before I learned to take decent photos!  This first one is more common, straight edged around the top 3 inches or so, rounded below.

Spiral Green Pitcher Showing Spirals Going to the Right

Spiral Green Pitcher Showing Spirals Going to the Right

Detail of that neat rope edge.

Hocking Spiral Green Depression Glass Pitcher Rope Top Detail

Hocking Spiral Green Depression Glass Pitcher Rope Top Detail

Here’s the more bulbous pitcher. The two look very different when you see them side by side.

Spiral Green Bulbous Pitcher

Spiral Green Bulbous Pitcher

This style has a rope rim too.

Spiral Green Depression Glass Bulbous Pitcher

Spiral Green Depression Glass Bulbous Pitcher

Plates are easy to spot. Yes, the spirals go clockwise (even I can tell that) but the biggest difference compared to Twisted Optic is the shape.  The Imperial plates have a small foot while Hocking Spiral is flat.

Spiral Green Depression Glass Lunch Plate

Spiral Green Depression Glass Lunch Plate

Hocking made a luncheon set in green Spiral plus a few accessory pieces like a vase, candy dish and a preserve dish.  The preserve dish is the same piece as the candy dish except it has notch in the lid.  Both pieces look much like the Cameo candy dish, similar shape and size, different finial and motif.  This is the Spiral preserve dish on Replacements.com.

Hocking Spiral Preserve with Notched Lid on Replacements.com

Hocking Spiral Preserve with Notched Lid on Replacements.com

Hocking made two styles of Spiral cream and sugar, a flat squarish shape and this footed style with a scroll handle.  This sugar bowl is similar to Cameo.

Hocking Spiral Green Depression Glass Footed Sugar with Scroll Handles

Hocking Spiral Green Depression Glass Footed Sugar with Scroll Handles

We used to find Spiral sherbets all the time but I’ve not seem them lately.  According to Florence, a lot of dealers carry the pattern but may not display it at glass shows.  That’s too bad as Spiral is lovely.  The shapes are pleasing, green is great and the spiral design is most attractive, so simple and fresh.

US Swirl Green Depression Glass Creamer

Swirls and Spirals – Depression Glass from US Glass and More

Over the next few posts we will look at several depression glass patterns that have spirals or swirls as their design motif.  US Glass, Hocking, Jeannette and Imperial all made colored glass dinnerware in spiral patterns during the early depression era and they and others used spiral designs for accessory pieces. These are among the […]

Federal Park Avenue Crystal Large Bowl

Federal Park Avenue – Ribbed Glass from the 1940s-60s

With our focus on depression glass you might wonder whether glass companies continued to produce dinnerware or accessory pieces after the 1930s.  They certainly did, although the styles and colors changed, and companies often made smaller sets than we saw with depression glass. We used to see Park Avenue at estate auctions.  It’s an appealing, simple […]

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Fostoria Glass Trojan Etched Topaz Yellow Cup and Saucer

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Serendipity! Finding Naomi’s Candy Jar – Hocking Green Depression Glass

The last few days I’ve gone through my older photos to write the blog posts about obscure patterns that we’re likely to see when out antiquing.  (Yes, it’s finally spring and that means antique shows, estate sales, flea markets and garage sales!)  One good thing about going back through older pictures is seeing something and […]

Indiana Windsor Iridescent Bowl

Two More Obscure Glass Patterns – Depression Era and Later

Last post we looked at two patterns you are likely to find at thrift stores or estate sales, Medallion by Anchor Hocking, and Windsor from Federal and later Indiana.  Both have depression-similar styling, colored glass and interesting designs and you are likely to see them labeled as depression glass.  Both are from the 1960s-70s, not […]